Katrina Marker Commemorates Flooding Of Lower 9th Ward

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NEW ORLEANS (AP) —  The catastrophic flooding of New Orleans’ Lower 9th Ward now has a commemorative marker at the site where a floodwall protecting the neighborhood collapsed, unleashing a wall of water 10 years ago during Hurricane Katrina.
The plaque was erected Monday and unveiled during an emotional ceremony. Dozens of residents from the Lower 9th Ward came out for the unveiling of the bright green commemorative marker, which is located on a grassy city-owned levee slope on Jourdan Road.
On August 29, 2005, the floodwall along the Industrial Canal catastrophically failed. The resulting flood wiped out the African-American neighborhood and killed scores of people.
The marker is located at the approximate location where the floodwall along the Industrial Canal broke at 7:45 a.m., the Monday morning when Katrina swept in to Louisiana.
The ceremony was headlined with musician Al Johnson, who appeared wearing a gold crown. He lived on Tennessee Street, near the breach, when Katrina hit. He played a new hit song he’s written about the storm called “The Lower 9th Ward Blues.”
Others recited poetry, sang gospel songs or gave personal testimonies, and residents welcomed the new marker with open arms.
“It gives the general public a chance to pass through here and see where the hole in our life is at,” said Ronald Lewis, director of the local House of Dance and Feathers, a Mardi Gras Indian museum, social and pleasure club and cultural center destroyed by Katrina.

 

 

 

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The Minimum Wage Plot Thickens

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By Eric L. Wesson Sr.
CALL Staff Writer

Opponents of the minimum wage increase that is slated to take affect this month submitted more than 6,000 signatures of the 3,400 signatures needed to the City Clerk on Friday, August 21, as a referendum  to try and overturn the ordinance Kansas City, Missouri’s City Council passed several weeks ago that would raise the City’s minimum wage to $13 an hour by 2020.
The City Council voted on Thursday, August 20, to place a citizen’s petition initiative before the voters on a November ballot. The ballot measure would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. The City had until Thursday to pass the measure so that it could get on the November ballot.

 

 

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Activist Seeking Re-Authorization Of Landmark Federal Law, Till Bill

Alvin.Sykes Emmett Till And Mamie Till Mobley

By Tracy Allen
CALL Staff Writer

While America deals with the racial overtones surrounding police brutality and the deaths of various African Americans in recent months that has created nationwide controversy and focus on black lives, local activist Alvin Sykes of Kansas City, Kas., is still committed to making sure all Americans receive proper justice.
Sykes has dedicated his life to making sure unsolved Civil Rights crimes aren’t ignored either. It is why Sykes, the president of The Emmett Till Justice Campaign (ETJC), a human rights group that was co-founded and chaired by  Till’s mother, Mamie Till Mobley, until her death, and led by human rights activist Sykes, is back at it again making sure that Till’s death and the federal law that followed is carried to fruition.

 

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