President Barack Obama Visits Cuba

Cuban President Raul Castro, left, shakes hands with U.S. President Barack Obama during a meeting in Revolution Palace, Monday, March 21, 2016. Brushing past profound differences, President  Obama and President Castro sat down for a historic meeting, offering critical clues about whether Obama's sharp U-turn in policy will be fully reciprocated. (AP Photo/Ismael Francisco)

Cuban President Raul Castro, left, shakes hands with U.S. President Barack Obama during a meeting in Revolution Palace, Monday, March 21, 2016. Brushing past profound differences, President Obama and President Castro sat down for a historic meeting, offering critical clues about whether Obama’s sharp U-turn in policy will be fully reciprocated. (AP Photo/Ismael Francisco)

HAVANA (AP) — Presi- dent Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro emerged from two hours of meetings in Havana agreeing on at least one thing: The 54-year eco- nomic embargo of Cuba needs to end so the economic ties between the two nations can

improve.
At a mostly cordial but spir-

ited press conference after- ward, stark differences quickly emerged on issues of democra- cy and human rights. After un- expectedly agreeing to allow U.S. reporters to ask questions, Castro pushed back on ques-

tions about his government’s human rights record, including the imprisonment of protesters and dissidents.

Blue Hills To Lead Charge For Development On Prospect

4 col erica brice

By Eric L. Wesson Sr. CALL Staff Writer

The Blue Hills Community Services corporation has been given the nod to develop a housing analysis and real es- tate development implementa- tion plan for the Prospect cor- ridor.

There was some controver- sy in the beginning as people felt that Blue Hills Commu- nity Services, under the new leadership of Ms. Erika Brice, executive director, and new Board Chairwoman, Ms. Nia Richardson, would not be suc- cessful citing Ms. Brice’s lack of experience.

To the contrary, Ms. Brice resume’ and experience in- dicates that she is extremely quali ed, according to Ms. Richardson.

“If I thought that this was

a sinking ship or that Erika couldn’t do this job then I wouldn’t be here. Others be- fore us may have felt that this is a sinking ship, that’s why they jumped ship, but I saw a huge opportunity with Blue Hills,” Ms. Richardson said.

“Not really knowing how I would step into the leadership position and then all of a sud- den people started leaving and going in all different directions I started having conversations with people and telling them that not all transitions are bad. Transition can be good it you do it right,” Ms. Richardson said.

“We wanted to take advan- tage of this opportunity and do more and start looking be- yond charity. The community will never change unless we change the mentality and start making people believe that

they can achieve at a different level. We shouldn’t be talking about the same things 20 years from now or even 10 years from now. We want things to happen in our community as fast as things have happened on the west side or downtown. I am really scared and want to stop what would potentially be the gentri cation of our com- munity,” she said.

Clinton And Trump Add Missouri Delegates To Their Totals

Trump Protest #1

By Eric L. Wesson Sr.

CALL Staff Writer

In what proved to be a nail biter in both the Democratic and Republican primaries in Missouri, both Secretary Hil- lary Clinton and businessman Donald Trump walked away with the prize of the majority of Missouri’s delegates.

In spite of circus like ral- lies where there have been re- corded outbursts of violence including a rally in Kansas City on Saturday, March 12, where some protesters were sprayed with pepper mace and inside a rally that was lled with anger and racial division undertones, Missouri Republicans gave Trump the edge with 382,093 votes or 40.8 percent of the vote.

He was followed by Sena- tor Ted Cruz who received 380,367 votes or 40.6 percent of the vote. Sen. Cruz did win Jackson County, 40 percent;

Clay County, 41 percent; Cass County, 43 percent and Platte County, 39 percent, counties.

Governor John Kasich came in third with 94,533 votes or 10.1 percent of the vote.

Senator Marco Rubio, who suspended his campaign af- ter losing to his home state of Florida, came in fourth with 57,006 votes or 6.1 percent of the vote.

Trump tallied ve of the six states in which primaries were held.

Gov. Kasich won his home state of Ohio as Trump’s only loss of the evening.

Trump’s win gives him 640 of the 1,237 delegates needed for the Republican nomination.

Sen. Cruz has tallied 405 del- egates and Gov. Kasich has tal- lied 138.

The remaining Republican primaries are closed primaries where Trump has not fared well.

Conservative Republicans

fear that Trump may appear at its convention in Cleveland, Ohio in July with 60 percent of the delegates needed for the nomination and force the con- vention to nominate him as the party’s choice. There is a rea- sonable possibility that neither Trump nor Cruz will have the required delegates by the time their convention is held.

On Wednesday Trump stated that if he is not the nominee at the convention in July he thinks there may be a riots.

“I think you’d have riots. I think you’d have riots,” Trump said Wednesday on CNN’s “New Day.” “I’m representing a tremendous many, many mil- lions of people,” he said.

The Republican Party moved closer to a contested conven- tion after Super Tuesday after Gov. Kasich won his home state and deprived Trump, the party’s front-runner, of its 66