Blacks From The Civil War To Today

By Eric L. Wesson Sr.
CALL Staff Writer

History tells us that black soldiers played a significant role in the military once they were allowed to enlist, but do we understand and realize the significance in their role?

When the Civil War broke out, the Union was reluctant to let black soldiers fight at all, citing concerns over white soldiers’ morale and the respect that black soldiers would feel entitled to when the war ended. For nearly two years, the Civil War was a whites-only affair. But, as the Union Army’s death toll increased, the skeptics relented and allowed blacks to enlist in the armed forces.

By war’s end, almost 200,000 black men had enlisted and their help resulted in the Union defeating the Confederate Army.

Voters To Decide The Future Of Kansas City Tuesday

By Eric L. Wesson Sr.
CALL Staff Writer

Kansas City voters will decide on Tuesday, Nov. 7, whether to move Kansas City forward, not only with a new single terminal airport, but in the area of future economic development and tourism for the City.
In addition, voters will decide whether the land currently under the control of Parks and Recreation be turned over to developers for projects or remain under the control of Parks and Recreation.

City Of Kansas City, Missouri Question No. 1 “Shall the City of Kansas City be authorized to construct a new passenger terminal at Kansas City International Airport and demolish existing terminals as necessary, with all costs paid solely from the revenues derived by the City from the operation of its airports and related facilities, and without the issuance of general airport revenue bonds unless such general airport revenue bonds have received prior voter approval?”
Question 1 addresses the construction of a new airport terminal which will create about 1,800 construction jobs and will cost taxpayers nothing in new taxes. Revenue for the project will come from airline ticket sales and other revenue streams connected to the airport.

Opponents of the measure say that a new terminal is not needed and renovations, which the City says will cost about $500 million, would correct the infrastructure issues at KCI.

Those repairs would be costly and pretty much ineffective according to airport officials, because they would have to be redone in a couple of years. They call the concept “a band-aid” approach.

Opponents also say that if the airlines go out of business then taxpayers would be on the hook for the $1.250 billion that the airport is expected to cost.

Supporters of the measure contend that it is imperative that infrastructure be modernized as well as major technology improvements.

Church Employee Charged With Arson

By Eric L. Wesson Sr.
CALL Staff Writer

A Kansas City man, who worked as the church’s custodian, has been charged in federal court with arson on Monday, Oct. 30.
Nathaniel D. Nelson, 48, was charged in U.S. District Court with committing arson inside of the Concord Cultural center which adjoins the Concord Fortress of Hope church.

Nelson was captured on a video inside the building’s foyer just before he unplugged the surveillance system, according to documents. The church’s infra-red system continued to record Nelson with his cellphone walking through the church. He was unaware of that second system, which recorded video of him outside spray-painting the graffiti, according to the allegations.

Deputy Chief Karl Oakman of the Kansas City, Mo., Police department, identified Nelson from the video. Oakman is also a member of Concord.

Nelson was not only a member, but was the church’s head custodian and was doing an outstanding job, according to Rev. Ron Lindsay, founder and senior pastor of Concord.

“He was doing an outstanding job,” Pastor Lindsay told THE CALL.
“We did know, after our background investigation, that he had a felony conviction although we did not learn that it was arson. We believe that people deserve a second chance and he had earned our support. He had just received a raise in pay and was about to receive full company benefits. He was a really good worker,” he said.