Archaeologists Dig At Malcolm X’s Boyhood Home In Boston, Mass.

2 col. MALCOLM X HOME

BOSTON (AP) – Archeolo- gists are digging at a boyhood home of Malcolm X in an ef- fort to uncover more about the slain black rights activist’s early life as well as the prop- erty’s long history, which pos- sibly includes Native American settlement.

The two-week archaeologi- cal dig began Tuesday, March 29, outside a 21/2-story home in Boston’s historically black Roxbury neighborhood that was built in 1874.

City Archaeologist Joseph Bagley said his of ce chose to dig up the site because it’s likely that work will be needed soon to shore up the founda- tion of the vacant and rundown structure.

President Barack Obama Visits Cuba

Cuban President Raul Castro, left, shakes hands with U.S. President Barack Obama during a meeting in Revolution Palace, Monday, March 21, 2016. Brushing past profound differences, President  Obama and President Castro sat down for a historic meeting, offering critical clues about whether Obama's sharp U-turn in policy will be fully reciprocated. (AP Photo/Ismael Francisco)

Cuban President Raul Castro, left, shakes hands with U.S. President Barack Obama during a meeting in Revolution Palace, Monday, March 21, 2016. Brushing past profound differences, President Obama and President Castro sat down for a historic meeting, offering critical clues about whether Obama’s sharp U-turn in policy will be fully reciprocated. (AP Photo/Ismael Francisco)

HAVANA (AP) — Presi- dent Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro emerged from two hours of meetings in Havana agreeing on at least one thing: The 54-year eco- nomic embargo of Cuba needs to end so the economic ties between the two nations can

improve.
At a mostly cordial but spir-

ited press conference after- ward, stark differences quickly emerged on issues of democra- cy and human rights. After un- expectedly agreeing to allow U.S. reporters to ask questions, Castro pushed back on ques-

tions about his government’s human rights record, including the imprisonment of protesters and dissidents.

Blue Hills To Lead Charge For Development On Prospect

4 col erica brice

By Eric L. Wesson Sr. CALL Staff Writer

The Blue Hills Community Services corporation has been given the nod to develop a housing analysis and real es- tate development implementa- tion plan for the Prospect cor- ridor.

There was some controver- sy in the beginning as people felt that Blue Hills Commu- nity Services, under the new leadership of Ms. Erika Brice, executive director, and new Board Chairwoman, Ms. Nia Richardson, would not be suc- cessful citing Ms. Brice’s lack of experience.

To the contrary, Ms. Brice resume’ and experience in- dicates that she is extremely quali ed, according to Ms. Richardson.

“If I thought that this was

a sinking ship or that Erika couldn’t do this job then I wouldn’t be here. Others be- fore us may have felt that this is a sinking ship, that’s why they jumped ship, but I saw a huge opportunity with Blue Hills,” Ms. Richardson said.

“Not really knowing how I would step into the leadership position and then all of a sud- den people started leaving and going in all different directions I started having conversations with people and telling them that not all transitions are bad. Transition can be good it you do it right,” Ms. Richardson said.

“We wanted to take advan- tage of this opportunity and do more and start looking be- yond charity. The community will never change unless we change the mentality and start making people believe that

they can achieve at a different level. We shouldn’t be talking about the same things 20 years from now or even 10 years from now. We want things to happen in our community as fast as things have happened on the west side or downtown. I am really scared and want to stop what would potentially be the gentri cation of our com- munity,” she said.