Kansas Citians Vote For Progress

By Eric L. Wesson Sr.
CALL Staff Writer

Kansas City voters overwhelmingly decided to tear down Terminal A and build a new single terminal at Kansas City International airport.
The special election generated strong regional interest and about 75 percent of those casting ballots supported the project, which is expected to cost slightly more than $1 billion to complete.

A total of 42,259 of the City’s 215,495 registered voters cast their ballots or 19.6 percent in the overall election.

However, not all voters voted for each Question on the ballot. A total 42,177 voters voted for Question 1, which won by a margin of 32,651 votes in support to 9,526 votes in opposition or 77.41 percent or 22.59 percent.

Mayor Sly James is delighted about the passage of the airport.
“I think it’s really impressive that the people of this City made their statement in such a resounding fashion,” said Mayor James, who has spent the last several months promoting the need for a new terminal to neighborhood groups, business associations and just about anyone else who would listen.

“I’ve said many, many times, KCI is our front door and it ought to be attractive and inviting. Our old front door served us well but it’s time for a new one that’s better and reflective of the 21st century.”

Blacks From The Civil War To Today

By Eric L. Wesson Sr.
CALL Staff Writer

History tells us that black soldiers played a significant role in the military once they were allowed to enlist, but do we understand and realize the significance in their role?

When the Civil War broke out, the Union was reluctant to let black soldiers fight at all, citing concerns over white soldiers’ morale and the respect that black soldiers would feel entitled to when the war ended. For nearly two years, the Civil War was a whites-only affair. But, as the Union Army’s death toll increased, the skeptics relented and allowed blacks to enlist in the armed forces.

By war’s end, almost 200,000 black men had enlisted and their help resulted in the Union defeating the Confederate Army.

Voters To Decide The Future Of Kansas City Tuesday

By Eric L. Wesson Sr.
CALL Staff Writer

Kansas City voters will decide on Tuesday, Nov. 7, whether to move Kansas City forward, not only with a new single terminal airport, but in the area of future economic development and tourism for the City.
In addition, voters will decide whether the land currently under the control of Parks and Recreation be turned over to developers for projects or remain under the control of Parks and Recreation.

City Of Kansas City, Missouri Question No. 1 “Shall the City of Kansas City be authorized to construct a new passenger terminal at Kansas City International Airport and demolish existing terminals as necessary, with all costs paid solely from the revenues derived by the City from the operation of its airports and related facilities, and without the issuance of general airport revenue bonds unless such general airport revenue bonds have received prior voter approval?”
Question 1 addresses the construction of a new airport terminal which will create about 1,800 construction jobs and will cost taxpayers nothing in new taxes. Revenue for the project will come from airline ticket sales and other revenue streams connected to the airport.

Opponents of the measure say that a new terminal is not needed and renovations, which the City says will cost about $500 million, would correct the infrastructure issues at KCI.

Those repairs would be costly and pretty much ineffective according to airport officials, because they would have to be redone in a couple of years. They call the concept “a band-aid” approach.

Opponents also say that if the airlines go out of business then taxpayers would be on the hook for the $1.250 billion that the airport is expected to cost.

Supporters of the measure contend that it is imperative that infrastructure be modernized as well as major technology improvements.